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with a science-type -- as somebody with a science-type background i took offense at that. i would challenge him to show us the linkage, the undeniable linkage between drought and change of weather and some kind of human activity. >> it's not like you're an m.i.t. graduate. oh, wait, you are. i think it was a message, not to congress but to whoever will be running the e.p.a. for the president. i don't see any of that language passing through the house and so it'll be via rule and reg, executive order potentially through the white house. the m.i.t. grad does bring up the science today as we sit on the 40th anniversary of roe v. wade, i find it amazing that the unmistakable scientific and biological evidence of the humanity of a -- an unborn child is denied by the white house while we have this debate over other science as well. >> clear think the administration likes to use regulatory agencies as a bludgeon to play to his constituencies. if the leadership wants to make sure i would vote for this debt ceiling increase, they could achieve the rains act to it, which my predecessor geoff davis got pa
are looking at fourth and eighth graders, fourth graders in reading and mathematics and science and eight the greatest in mathematics and science. >host: we have special number set up if you want to join this conversation -- what do we learn as we dig into help fourth graders and eighth graders are doing? guest: the broad strokes over view, we see that our fourth graders, they're reading has improved as well as mathematics but their silence is largely not changed compared to the previous administration. over the longer term, they have improved and their eight th graders have not improved much. in general, the assessments compare the u.s. to a variety of countries and education systems within countries. some of our state's took the assessment independently along with the u.s. total. when you look over the entire set, i would say the u.s. among these countries shows up in the top 10 or 12 countries or systems. host: we can see who was included in the fourth grade reading study. why these countries? guest: they are given the same tests so much of the efforts in an international asset as maki
the dark powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction. we dare not tempt them with weakness. for only when our arms are sufficient beyond doubt can we be certain beyond doubt that they will never be employed. but neither can two great and powerful groups of nations take comfort from our present course both sides overburdened by the cost of modern weapons, both rightly alarmed by the steady spread of the deadly atom, yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind's final war. so let us begin anew -- remembering on both sides that civility is not a sign of weakness, and sincerity is always subject to proof. let us never negotiate out of fear. but let us never fear to negotiate. let both sides explore what problems unite us instead of belaboring those problems which divide us. let both sides, for the first time, formulate serious and precise proposals for the inspection and control of arms and bring the absolute power to destroy other nations under the absolute control of all nations. le
with author, historian richard norton smith. the cover story of "christian science monitor" - a look inside as some of the more famous second terms richard norton smith is talking about. a call from the bronx, new york. caller: if the losing presidential candidate is not an office holder, does he get to participate in the inauguration? host: we know that mitt romney will not be here tomorrow, neither president bush. guest: president bush 41 is just out of the hospital. i wonder if jimmy carter -- as well as bill clinton. -- host: he will be in attendance, as well as bill clinton. guest: that is a relatively new tradition. herbert hoover was invited to the kennedy inaugural in 1961. he was a very close friend to the president's father. the weather was so bad that he really could not get here. but he intended to be here. host: ronald reagan had the warmest and coldest inauguration days. guest: the great story about the weather -- william howard taft, who had this self deprecatory sense of humor -- there was a blizzard. he had too much sense of the ridiculous to be a politician. he said, i alw
of fascism or communism with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers we'll need to equip our children for the future, or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now, more than ever, we must do these things together, as one nation and one people. (applause) this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steeled our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. (applause) an economic recovery has begun.(applause) america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities that this world without boundaries demands: youth and drive; diversity and openness; an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment, and we will seize it -- so long as we seize it together. (applause) for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. (applause) we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders o
and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not counting the $400 billion already saved from winding down the wars in iraq and afghanistan. so we've made progress. we are moving towards our ultimate goal of getting to a $4 trillion reduction. and there will be more deficit reduction when congress decides what to do about the $1.2 trillion in automatic spending cuts that have been pushed off until next month. the fact is, though, we can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. the cuts we've already made to priorities other than medicare, medicaid, social s
been a time of proud achievement. we have made enormous strides in science and industry and agriculture. we have shared our wealth more broadly than ever. we have learned at last to manage a modern economy to assure its continued growth. we have given freedom new reach. we have begun to make its promise real for black as well as for white. we see the hope of tomorrow in the youth of today. i know america's youth. i believe in them. we can be proud that they are better educated, more committed, more passionately driven by conscience than any generation in our history. no people has ever been so close to the achievement of a just and abundant society, or so possessed of the will to achieve it. and because our strengths are so great, we can afford to appraise our weaknesses with candor and to approach them with hope. standing in this same place a third of a century ago, franklin delano roosevelt addressed a nation ravaged by depression and gripped in fear. he could say in surveying the nation's troubles -- "they concern, thank god, only material things." our crisis today is in reverse. we
, historian richard norton smith. the cover story of "christian science monitor" - a look inside as some of the more famous second terms richard norton smith is talking about. vietnam was lbj. a call from the bronx, new york. caller: if the losing presidential candidate is not an office holder, does he get to participate in the inauguration? will mitt romney be there? host: we know that mitt romney will not be here tomorrow, neither president bush. guest: president bush 41 is just out of the hospital. i wonder if jimmy carter -- host: he will be in attendance, as well as bill clinton. immy carter is 87. -- jimmy carter is 87. guest: that is a relatively new tradition. herbert hoover was invited to the kennedy inaugural in 1961. he was a very close friend to the president's father. the weather was so bad that he really could not get here. but he intended to be here. host: ronald reagan had the warmest and coldest inauguration days. 1981 and 1985. guest: the great story about the weather -- william howard taft, who had this self deprecatory sense of humor -- there was a blizzard. he said,
listeners. we're talking with author, historian richard norton smith. the cover story of "christian science monitor" - a look inside as some of the more famous second terms richard norton smith is talking about. a call from the bronx, new york. caller: if the losing presidential candidate is not an office holder, does he get to participate in the inauguration? host: we know that mitt romney will not be here tomorrow, neither president bush. guest: president bush 41 is just out of the hospital. i wonder if jimmy carter -- host: he will be in attendance, as well as bill clinton. guest: that is a relatively new tradition. herbert hoover was invited to the kennedy inaugural in 1961. he was a very close friend to the president's father. the weather was so bad that he really could not get here. but he intended to be here. host: ronald reagan had the warmest and coldest inauguration days. guest: the great story about the weather -- william howard taft, who had this self deprecatory sense of humor -- there was a blizzard. he said, i always thought it would be a cold day when i would be elected a pr
, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. we'll restore science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its costs. we'll harness harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. and we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. all this we can do. all this we will do. now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions, who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done, what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose and necessity to courage. what the cynics that to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them, that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a ret
"the christian science monitor." she is the white house reporter for that publication. bachus through the president's day. >> it starts with a religious -- walk us through the president's day. guest: it will start with a religious service, near lafayette square. then they had up to capitol hill. as you said, 11:20, that will be the swearing in. i think that will take place closer to 11:30. then he makes his speech at 11:50. after that, they head into the capitol building for an inaugural luncheon. that is followed by a parade down pennsylvania avenue. in the evening, there are two inaugural balls this year. one is a commander in chief's all for the military, followed by the big inaugural ball. they have cut back from 10 to two. the second inaugural ball will be quite big. it is not quite as much downsizing as they are making it out to be. >> the president is only going to one location? guest: according to the schedule, he is at the first ball at 8:45, and at 9:10, he's at the other ball. he is a quarter years older, maybe he wants an earlier night. host: does the president of many tra
with muskets and militias. no single person can train all the math and science teachers will need to equip our children for the future, building the roads, networks, and research laboratories that will bring the jobs to our shores. now more than ever we must do these things together, as one nation, one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steal our resolve and prove our resilience. a decade of war is ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all the qualities of this world but that demands. youth and driver, diversity and open this, an analyst capacity for risk -- an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. we will see that so long as we see this together. host: the editorial page from "usa today." they wrote this about president obama, saying that a decade of war is ending -- host: fred barnes, executive editor of "the weekly standard," wrote this in the opinion state -- opinion section of "the wall street journal." host: mr obama was less explicit but his emphasis was on the
science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its costs. we'll harness harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. and we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. all this we can do. all this we will do. now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions, who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done, what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose and necessity to courage. when the cynics fail to understand -- what the cynics that to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them, that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, can they afford -- care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. whether
that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthquake country. that fact was demonstrated by the different experiences in death and destruction in haiti where earthquake resilientcy is nonexistent and chile that took its playbook from california. that's why i'm optimistic that science and engineering cals make the coastle zone a safer place to live. there are important differences between the problem of earthquake hazards and coastal hazards. if we put aside those umph bumper stick thears say stop plate tectonics. huges have an effect on the rate -- humans have the an effect on the rate and the intensity of earthquakes. on the other hand, we have increased coastal hazards by increasing the rate of wetland loss anbar yur island erosion and sea level rise. what this means in addressing coastal hazards we need to confront both mother nature and the enhanced risk from impacts. i would argue the philosophy we have to approach this with is exactly the same. scientists can make recommendati
events this morning. the council for science and the environment discusses disasters in the environment. the discussion will focus on the lessons of hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought, and the earthquake in japan. that is on c-span3 at 8:30 on with -- , today's a few moments headlines and phone calls, live on washington journal. the us house of representatives will be in session at two o'clock eastern. a disaster aid spending bill for hurricane sandy. in 45 minutes, we will be joined by scott rigell of virginia. we will talk about his recent we will talk about his recent letter to
from not knowing the science of this epidemic of violence. these are a few of the 23 executive actions i am announcing today but as important as the steps are, they are in no way a substitute for action from members of congress. to make a real and lasting difference, congress must act. congress must act soon. i am calling on congress to pass some very specific proposals right away. first, it is time for congress to require a universal background check for anyone trying to buy a gun. [applause] the law already requires licensed gun dealers to run background checks and over the last 14 years, that has kept 1.5 million of the wrong people for getting their hands on a gun but it is hard to enforce that law when as many as 40% of all gun purchases are conducted without a background check. that is not safe. that is not smart. is not fair to responsible gun buyers or sellers. if you want to buy a gun, whether it is from a licensed dealer or a private seller, you should at least have to show you are not a felon or somebody legally prohibited from buying one. this is common sense. an overwhelmi
. political science will look at the system and say, what is wrong with this. the historian will look at it and say, how to get this way -- how did it this way. we tend to be less active in suggesting changes to the system. floyd riddick said, the rules of the senate are perfect. what he meant by that was, the senators have exclusive control over writing their own rules. these are the rules that have written, and this is what i carry out. if the want to change them, they will change and to fit their circumstances. -- and them to fit their circumstances. the have been filibustering since 1789. -- they have been filibustering since 1789. the senate and house have developed in remarkably different ways over time. the constitution said, each house to right the wrong roles. age house can write their own rules. -- the house can write their own rules. you come to the senate. the rules of the senate have always given much more muscle to the minority. sometimes it is the minority party. sometimes it is a minority faction inside a minority part to says, "i object," and everything stops. every s
is a student at northeastern university and studying political science. this is the fight back we are talking about. please say a quick word about what it is like trying to navigate through poverty when you are a single mom and what you say to all of those single moms watching right now trying to navigate the same journey. >> thank you for having me. it is not easy to be able to come and leave my baby back. i was feeling sad. i did not want to leave him. this is a fight for plenty of women, and not only single mothers. single fathers out there as well that struggle just as much as i do. [applause] i know plenty of them and they struggle. picture this. you are a single parent, but you have to come up with a way how to feed your family, work at the same time to pay bills, and go to school to get an education to better your life. last year, i only made $8,000 the whole year. my food stamps were cut. that was the only way i was able to feed my son, $85 a month. the average family spends close to $500 or more. you expect me to spend $85 and live with that for my son. we had to be sent to a shelter
to a program to encourage people who attend u.s. universities with science, technology, engineering and mathematics backgrounds to stay in the u.s., use those skills to grow our economy, help our country, rather than go back to their home country. host: the white house sees hope for bipartisan deal on immigration based on what senator marco rubio of florida, republican, has put out there. he's put some ideas out there. do you -- do you endorse liz ideas? guest: i have not spoken to senator rubio yet, but we welcome those ideas. there are others in the house that are working on specific proposals and wider ranging proposals, and we want to take a look at this. you know, we are a nation of immigrants. there is not a person to be found who's a u.s. citizen who can't go back a few generations or several generations and find someone in their family who came to the united states to better their lives. my grandfather came from germany. my wife's parents came from ireland. this is a very, very common thing. we are also a nation of laws. so finding a way to address this issue and fix a very
, that it's better not to know. we need to know and it's worth studying, and we should embrace the science and allow the research to go forward so we can learn more about the effect of violence in the entertainment industry -- depicted through entertainment -- and the impact it may or may not have on society and on children. so that was a very specific item that he did include as part of his package. and i think generally, the proposals the president put forward yesterday were recognized as fairly substantive and comprehensive, and that's one of them. >> very last thing, on the debt ceiling. republicans like pat toomey have suggested that you should prioritize what debts you pay off so that things like social security get paid -- payments. as the president said in his press conference last week, he wants them to be paid; wants to make sure people don't lose their benefits. why not prioritize those payments? i just want to give you a chance to respond to the republican plan that's out there. >> sure. well, there's not a specific plan; there's somebody talking about it. but let's be real her
degrees in science, technology, engineering, and math. we need to expand -- we need to expand the h1vb visa program. 5, immigration reform must include an effective and efficient employment verification system. such a system can and must prevent unlawful employment, a record as employers and employees who play by the rules and protect america's fundamental rights. 6, we must protect our borders through smart enforcement. according to the migration policy institute, immigration enforcement takes its share of federal law enforcement spending. today undocumented migration is below zero. we will not meet our immigration challenge through enforcement alone. the goal of our immigration enforcement policy should be the removal -- we should deport serious offenders. we should not deport people whose serious crime is a lack of papers. by deporting such people we remove the trust between law-enforcement and the immigrant community. if you break up families and of five children of the love and protection of their families all in our zeal to enforce the law according to data, three-fourths of thos
lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. we'll restore science to its rightful place and wield technology's wonders to raise health care's quality and lower its costs. we'll harness harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. and we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. all this we can do. all this we will do. now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions, who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what this country has already done, what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose and necessity to courage. what the cynics that to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them, that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. the question we have today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified
on the filibuster? >> there is a division between political scientists and historians about this. political science will look at the system and say, what is wrong with this. the historian will look at it and say, how did it get way. we tend to be less active in suggesting changes to the system. floyd riddick said, the rules of the senate are perfect. what he meant by that was, the senators have exclusive control over writing their own rules. these are the rules that have written, and this is what i carry out. if the want to change them, they will change them to fit their circumstances. they have been filibustering since 1789. the senate and house have developed in remarkably different ways over time. the constitution said, each house can write their own rules. you come to the senate. the rules of the senate have always given much more muscle to the minority. sometimes it is the minority party. sometimes it is a minority faction inside a minority part to says, "i object," and everything stops. every senate majority leader is under a lot of burden to try to get a very uncooperative organization to wo
: the science on this is pretty clear -- the question of how you dress -- address thus is obviously much less clear. but caller is alluding to the idea of there being some kind of carbon tax, some kind of way of making it less economically attractive to burn fossil fuels thereby increasing the cost which is then passed on to taxpayers in directly with regulatory action. to do that can have the same the fact. -- effect. there's no question there is an economic cost to addressing this. some of them are direct to consumers and some are little bit longer term and harder to see. it will impose strict regulatory regimes on burning carbon fuels, do we become less globally competitive with countries like china and india that are moving much lower if at all to address this? can -- they can manufacture things cheaply than we can as a result. it ultimately comes down to a value system of -- do we want to sustain our competitiveness for now or do we want to try to head off a problem that is accumulating gradually and will be a much bigger problem potentially down the road host: we are waiting for the hou
focusing on what is next. the next four years is which i say chon science monitor two for the president. tomorrow, saturday is being called a national day of service. the white house ceremony will take place on sunday at noon eastern as the president is sworn in from the blue room of the white house. the president ceremony will take place monday followed by a congressional luncheon and a parade. one question raced by on outgoing president 52 years ago this woke was the role in government in solving america's problems. we'll share with you some of the comments of dwight eisenhower in his farewell address. what is the role in government in solving america's problems. you can join the conversation by giving us a call. you can send us an e-mail at journal at cspan.org. let's begin with the act two second terms for u.s. presidents have been problematic but not cursed. what history will says about how president obama will do. will obama blow another mandate. meanwhile from the hill newspaper there is this words from senator mitch mcconnell after four years of frosty relations senator mcconnel
and localities offer -- what is their effectiveness? guest: the national academy of sciences put out a report in 2004 and they could not find any benefit. the entire panel agreed on that. you look at what type of guns get turned then and 99% of the guns are not operational. they are just something that people have around, maybe rusting for decades or something like that so they go and get rid of them. host: georgia, republican -- caller: i have three quick points -- i like the contrast between the differences of semi automatic guns. i would like for someone to define what is an assault rifle. they are all mostly semi automatic so why not call them all assault -- all assault weapons so one abandoned. to me, the background check is not for the mental attitude of an individual. guest: i agree with what the caller was saying. if you want to go and ban guns, it should be based on the characteristic of the guns in terms of how they operate. how did they fire bullets, the rapidity with which they fire, the damage with which they used and not how much the gun looks. you should not ban guns based on w
are a mother of a young child. she is a student at northeastern university and studying political science. this is the fight back we are talking about. please say a quick word about what it is like trying to navigate through poverty when you are a single mom and what you say to all of those single moms watching right now trying to navigate the same journey. >> thank you for having me. it is not easy to be able to come and leave my baby back. i was feeling sad. i did not want to leave him. this is a fight for plenty of women, and not only single mothers. single fathers out there as well that struggle just as much as i do. [applause] i know plenty of them and they struggle. picture this. you are a single parent, but you have to come up with a way how to feed your family, work at the same time to pay bills, and go to school to get an education to better your life. last year, i only made $8,000 the whole year. my food stamps were cut. that was the only way i was able to feed my son, $85 a month. the average family spends close to $500 or more. you expect me to spend $85 and live with that for
states, to establish post offices and post roads, to promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries, mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from california, mr. bera. mr. bera:to constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court, to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences against the law of nations, to declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water, to raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years, mr. goodlatte: i now yield to the gentleman from virginia, mr. griffith. mr. griffith:to provide and maintain a navy, to make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces, to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions, to provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the militia, and for governing such par
: the national academy of sciences put out a report in 2004 and they could not find any benefit. the entire panel agreed on that. you look at what type of guns get turned then and 99% of the guns are not operational. they are just something that people have around, maybe rusting for decades or something like that so they go and get rid of them. host: georgia, republican -- caller: i have three quick points -- i like the contrast between the differences of semi automatic guns. i would like for someone to define what is an assault rifle. they are all mostly semi automatic so why not call them all assault -- all assault weapons so one abandoned. to me, the background check is not for the mental attitude of an individual. guest: i agree with what the caller was saying. you want to go and ban guns, it should be based on the characteristic of the guns in terms of how they operate. how did they fire bullets, the rapidity with which they fire, the damage whichwith which they used and not how much the gun looks. you should not ban guns based on what it looks like. that is one reason why i don't think anyb
cannot find the sciences and mathematicians in the u.s. there are family farms that have shut down. others have moved to mexico because they cannot find the workers. the whole economy is suffering because we cannot grow without immigration. we are steering in the face of a potential great stimulus without it costing at trillion dollars. we have also seen the human complexity of immigration intensified. the kids to have been born here to undocumented parents, the kids who came here when there were four or five years old. parents who have worked in a job for 15 years and are hoping this is their future, that they can be part of the american dream. every single day, it becomes more complicated. until lawmakers act, president, the congress, we are allowed in this humanitarian situation to golan. it strikes me as so un american that we ignore it. ignoring the problem does not make the problem go away. there has been a consensus, i believe, that two things are not going to happen. on one hand, we are not going to run the 12 million people and keep them out of the country. -- ralph up 12
a partnership with life sciences and our universities to spur research and produce high paying jobs and because indiana is agriculture, we envision our state becoming a hub of food and agricultural breakthroughs by supporting the development an agriculture innovation corridor, indiana will continue to lead from the farm across the midwest and across the world. [applause] our budget also ensures that the indiana economic development corporation is adequately equipped to attract more business and investment to the hoosier state and to operate with greater transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] and lastly, our budget keeps faith with those to whom we owe the most. it was ape hamlin con that we must quote, care for him who shall have born the battle. but in indiana, our veterans are hurting, and they need our help believe it or not, post 911 hoosier receipt vans are an unemployment rate higher than the national average. we have to do better. we owe these heroes nothing less. heroes like big tim wysong. he got that nickname on the football team on hagerstown high school in
of science and in varmint posts a form of disasters and the environment. after remarks from the head of fema, there'll be a discussion on the effects of hurricane katrina and the tsunami in japan. that is at 8:30 eastern. and c-span2 at 9:00 a.m., the ceo -- the brookings institution conference on the economy. guests will include the chairman of alcoa, procter and gamble, and and nike. >> student camp video entries with your message to the president are now due. get them to cease and by this friday for your chance at the grand prize of $5,000. there is $50,000 in total prices. go to studentcam.org. >> president obama told reporters at the white house that he would be open to using an executive order to raise the legal limit to pay its bills. he also talked about reducing gun violence. president of the united states. >> please have a seat. good morning. i thought it might make sense to take some questions this week as my first term comes to an end. it has been a busy and productive for years. i expect the same thing from i expect the same thing from the
lives. we don't benefit from ignorance. we don't benefit from not knowing the science of this epidemic of violence. these are a few of the 23 executive actions that i'm announcing today. but as important as these steps are, they are in know no way a substitute for action from members of congress. to make a real and lasting difference, congress too must act. and congress must act soon. and i'm calling on congress to pass some very specific proposals right away. first it's time for congress to require a universal background check for anyone trying to buy a gun. [applause] the law already requires licensed gun dealers to run background check and over the last 14 years that's kept 1.5 million of the wrong people from getting their hands on a gun. but it's hard to enforce that law when as many as 40% of all gun purchases are conducted without a background check. that's not safe, that's not smart, that's not fair to responsible gun buyers or sellers. if you want to buy a gun, whether it's from a licensed dealer or a private seller, you should at least have to show you are not a felon or some
train all the math and science teachers we will need to equip our children for the future or build the roads and networks and research labs that will bring new jobs and businesses to our shores. now more than ever, we must do these things together. as one nation. and when people. -- and one people. [applause] this generation of americans has been tested by crises that steal our resolve and proved our resilience. a decade of war is now ending. [applause] an economic recovery has begun. [applause] america's possibilities are limitless for we possess all the qualities this world would the band -- use and drive, diversity and openness, and analysts capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and we will see so long as we see it together -- [applause] 4 we, the people, understand our country cannot succeed with a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we believe america's prosperity must rest upon the shoulders of a rising middle class. we know america thrives when every person can find independence and pride in t
judgment of science, but none can avoid the devastating impact of raging fires and crippling drought and more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition, we must lead it. we cannot cede to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industries, we must claim its promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure -- our forests and waterways, our crop lands and snow-capped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care bythat's what will lend meaning to the creed our fathers once declared. lasting peace do not require perpetual war. (applause) our brave men and women in uniform, tempered by the flames of battle, are unmatched in skill and courage. (applause) our citizens, seared by the memory of those we have lost, paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those enemies into the surest of friends -- and we must carry those lessons into this time as
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